1. "The blood that is shed by your children
    is as if it were our own, it is the same.
    Ours is the pain and the pride of their heroism;
    we fight the same struggle and walk the same road.”

    A really communist song, written by Uruguayan revolutionary musician Aníbal Sampayo, whose title translates as The Same Trench. Sung by Susi Misa, La Misma Trinchera is an anthem of armed struggle and internationalism among the oppressed countries of the third world. This album was released in 1983, contextualizing in particular the references to the revolutions in Grenada and Nicaragua. Emblazoned on the cover of this hard-to-find LP is an image of indigenous rebel leader Tupac Amaru II, the namesake of the Uruguayan Tupamaro guerrillas who rocked that country at the turn of the 70s. Give it a listen!

    Cuba primero, Cuba que al mundo grita
    que no es tan fiero lobo como lo pintan.
    Ha derrotado los yanquis, Cuba es la guía,
    su llama en Centroamérica está encendida.
    Grenada y Nicaragua logran dos nuevos
    triunfos de independencia para sus pueblos.
    Suriname y Guyana son otro ejemplo
    al quitarse cadenas de tanto tiempo.

    Ba-da-ba-ba-da-ba-ba………..
    Cuando el ritmo de la lonja dice al repicar…
    Ba-da-ba-ba-da-ba-ba………..
    …que ya los pueblos en armas nadie detendrá!

    Son la misma trinchera, el mismo enemigo
    del centroamericano y del palestino.
    La misma intervención y agresión directa:
    la norteamericana y su soldadesca.
    La sangre derramada por vuestros hijos
    como si fuera nuestra sangre, es lo mismo.
    Nuestro el dolor y orgullo de su heroísmo,
    somos la misma lucha, el mismo camino.

    Ba-da-ba-ba-da-ba-ba………..
    Cuando el ritmo de la lonja dice al repicar…
    Ba-da-ba-ba-da-ba-ba………..
    …que ya los pueblos en armas nadie detendrá!

     

  2. People’s Army, music and lyrics by Aníbal Sampayo, sung by Susi Misa. From Uruguay, 1983.

     
  3. From Maria Esther Gilio’s book “The Tupamaro Guerrillas.”

     
  4. My newest acquisition. <3

     
  5. Mexican communist folk musician Judith Reyes sings a corrido about the events of October 8th, 1969, when the Uruguayan Tupamaro guerrillas temporarily seized the town of Pando from the military government.

    The lyrics (which I transcribed) to this extremely rare song are embedded in the video for your convenience. Enjoy!

     
     
  6. Uruguayan President Pepe Mujica, back in the 70s when he was off robbing banks and shit with the Tupamaros.

     
  7. Raul Sendic: founder of the Uruguayan Tupamaros, who built a really-cute-and-not-creepy-and-I-mean-that-in-the-least-sarcastic-way-possible cult of personality around him during the late 60s through the 70s. He would later become Irish and build a cookie factory in a tree, or—in the competing account—adorn red pants and organize the resistance to Gargamel.

     

  8. "Habrá patria para todos o no habrá para ninguno!"
    — 

    Movimiento de Liberación Nacional-Tupamaros (Uruguay)

     
  9. Cielo de los Tupamaros: interpretada por Eduardo Tacconi, letra y musica por Osiris Rodriguez Castillo. Este es uno de los mejores himnos revolucionarios de todo el continente. :-)

    Cielo, mi cielito lindo,
    danza de viento y juncal,
    prenda de los Tupamaros,
    flor de la Banda Oriental.

    El cielo de los matreros
    miren qué oscuro que está..
    Bien haiga las medialunas
    que lo andan por alumbrar.

    Pa’ mí que los chapetones
    ya nos cuentan redota’os
    y es que no han cáido en que somos
    pocos, pero bien monta’os.

    Con Venancio Benavides
    y Perico, “el Bailarín”,
    saldremos a chuza y bolas
    agatas suene el clarín.

    ¡Yo vide un águila mora
    volando sobre un chilcal,
    y era el alma cimarrona
    campiando la libertad!

    Cielo, mi cielito lindo,
    danza de viento y juncal,
    prenda de los Tupamaros
    flor de la Banda Oriental.

     
     
  10. Ejército del Pueblo, letra y musica por Aníbal Sampayo, canta Susi Misa. Es una cancion dedicada a los martires del Movimiento de Liberacion Nacional (MLN-Tupamaros) de Uruguay.

    People’s Army, lyrics and music by Anibal Sampayo, sung by Susi Misa. This is a song dedicated to the martyrs of the National Liberation Movement (MLN-Tupamaros) of Uruguay.

    This song appears on Sampayo’s album Canto a la Liberacion, featuring various songs dedicated to martyrs of Latin America’s liberation struggle as well as a few dealing with the revolutionary movement of Uruguay. Beneath the album title is a pink object the shape of Uruguay, while the bottom right features an image of Tupac Amaru, the namesake of the MLN-Tupamaros.

     
     

  11. MLN TUPAMAROS - PUEBLO EN LUCHA [URUGUAY, 197?]

    This is a beautiful instrumental track from the National Liberation Movement of Uruguay, better known as the Tupamaros, named after the indigenous resistance leader Tupac Amaru II. The MLN conducted an urban guerrilla war against the Uruguayan state during the late 60s and 1970s, basing their strategy on the works of revolutionary military strategist Abraham Guillén. Guillén’s philosophy differed from that of more well known figures Che Guevara and Regis Debray, both of whom favored a rural strategy for Latin American guerrillas. In the heavily urban Uruguay however, in which half of the population lived in and around Montevideo, an insurgency based in the countryside was completely unrealistic.

    The Tupamaros were one of the more successful (a term here used very loosely) guerrilla groups in Latin America and today constitute the largest bloc of votes in Uruguay’s ruling Frente Amplio coalition. The current president, Jose “Pepe” Mujica, is a former combatant of the MLN.

    As was common with many of Latin America’s insurgencies, the MLN both produced music in its own name and inspired the creation of sympathetic music from others. Uruguayan musicians like Hector Numa Moraes, Anibal Sampayo, and Daniel Viglietti recorded songs supportive of the Tupamaros, while they received internationalist backing from artists like Mexican singer Judith Reyes.

     

  12. Cantares del Calabozo - Plan y Fantasia [Uruguay, 1970s]

    "Al fin como al principio todo es plan y fantasia."

    Just a quick one for you all, this is a song that comes out of Uruguay’s Tupamaro guerrilla movement of the 60s/70s. It appeared on the 1990(?) album Para Cantarle al Hombre: Homenaje a Raul Sendic, Sendic having been the founder of the MLN Tupamaros and a figure of veneration for the movement.

    The audio quality is pretty bad, since this was recorded in less-than-ideal circumstances, but it’s still worth a listen!

     
  13. Esta es una cancion que viene del Movimiento de Liberacion Nacional de Uruguay, mejor conocido como los Tupamaros. El MLN nacio en los años 60 con la intencion de provocar una revolucion en el pais por la via guevarista; es decir, utilizando la teoria del Che Guevara, cual propone la formacion de pequeñas celulas armadas en las montañas cuyas acciones pudieran ser la ‘chispa’ de una insurreccion nacional. Pero el caracter mas urbano de la poblacion uruguaya le impulso al MLN adoptar una estrategia para su propia realidad nacional, y seria uno de los primeros para intentar aplicar al foquismo (termino para la estrategia militar del Che, acuñado por el frances Regis Debray) a un escenario urbano.

    Cielito de los Tupamaros sirve como uno de los himnos semi-oficiales del MLN. Fue escrito por Osiris Rodriguez Castillos y aqui la toca y canta Eduardo Tacconi. Disfruten. :-)

    Cielo, mi cielito lindo,
    danza de viento y juncal,
    prenda de los tupamaros,
    flor de la Banda Oriental.

    El cielo de los matreros
    miren qué oscuro que está…
    Bien haiga las medialunas
    que lo andan por alumbrar…

    Pa’ mí que los chapetones
    ya nos cuentan redotaos
    y es que no han cáido en que somos
    pocos, pero bien montaos…

    Con Venancio Benavides
    y Perico, “el Bailarín”,
    saldremos a chuza y bolas
    agatas suene el clarín.

    ¡Yo vide un águila mora
    volando sobre un chilcal,
    y era el alma cimarrona
    campiando la libertad!

    Cielo, mi cielito lindo,
    danza de viento y juncal,
    prenda de los tupamaros
    flor de la Banda Oriental..

     
     

  14. DANIEL VIGLIETTI - LA CANCION DE PABLO [URUGUAY, 1970]

    "Pablo is a man that knows that life is changing,
    the comrades are with him marching toward the dawn.
    And if they put him in chains, others will stand up demanding liberty.”

    One of my favorite songs lately, Daniel Viglietti’s folk ballad Pablo’s Song is a story of the emotional departure of a man from his home and family to join the guerrilla struggle. Viglietti, being from Uruguay, is likely referencing the experience of many of his comrades that left their homes to join the Tupamaros, a former

    urban guerrilla movement that is now a member of the ruling Frente Amplio coalition, though the lyrics remain generalized enough to refer to any number of armed struggles across the continent which, in the tumultuous era when he wrote this song, were ubiquitous across Latin America.

    In each verse, Viglietti points out that the repressive state forces will come looking and asking for him in his house, trying to find information on his whereabouts to track down the notorious guerrillero. He instructs his wife to resist their interrogation, and to remember that he is off fighting in the name of freedom.

    I’ve posted a couple of songs by Daniel Viglietti before, and I’m always surprised how many people don’t know about him. He rivals Victor Jara for his poetic finesse and composition, and his influence in the development in nueva canción is only slightly less than the Chilean legend. Anyway, below are the lyrics in Spanish and with an English translation, give it a listen! If you have any questions or comments, feel free to contact me, and definitely check out past episodes of this series here.

    SPANISH:

    Compañera, vendrán a preguntar por mí;
    Si yo he sido, dónde estoy, si usted sabe adónde fue su marido.
    Usted levanta la vista, mira y calla, está pensando:
    Pablo andará por la tierra, su bandera enarbolando,
    Una bandera de trigo, de pan y de vino, levantando.
    Por el camino, a los hombres irá enseñando la libertad.

    Compañera, buscándome vendrán aquí,
    Mi retrato, una carta, algún signo para dar con mi rastro.
    Usted recuerda mis manos, ya no piensa, está soñando:
    Pablo se fue navegante por un mar de sangre joven
    Con su rebelde destino, sin pan y sin vino andar luchando.
    Su corazón guerrillero olvida en las calles la soledad.

    Compañera, vendrán a preguntar otra vez,
    Si me ha visto, si le escribo, si usted sabe adónde fue su marido.
    Usted los mira a los ojos, con ternura va pensando:
    Pablo es un hombre que sabe que la vida está cambiando,
    Los compañeros lo llevan hacia el alba caminando.
    Y si le ponen cadenas irán otros brazos por libertad.

    Pablos hay muchos y andando por la tierra van cantando
    Con sus banderas de trigo, de pan y de vino, van luchando.
    Pablos hay muchos y andando por la tierra van cantando.

    ENGLISH:

    Comrade, they will come asking about me
    if I’ve been here, where I am, if you know where your husband went.
    And you lift your gaze, look, are silent, and think:
    Pablo will walk the earth, hoisting his flag;
    a flag of wheat, bread and wine will be raised.
    Along the road, he will be teaching men about freedom!

    Comrade, they will come looking for me,
    my portrait, a letter, any sign to give away my trail.
    And you will remember my hands, no longer thinking, only dreaming:
    Pablo left to navigate in the sea of young blood
    with his rebellious destiny, without bread or wine, continuing to fight.
    His guerrilla heart forgets loneliness in the streets.

    Comrade, they will come asking again
    if you have seen me, if I write you, if you know where your husband went.
    You will look into their eyes, with tenderness and think:
    Pablo is a man that knows that life is changing,
    the comrades are with him marching toward the dawn.
    And if they put him in chains, others will stand up demanding liberty.

    There are many Pablos and they sing while marching the land,
    with their flags of wheat, bread and wine they go forth fighting.
    There are many Pablos and they sing while marching the land.

     
  15. soybronwynpo:

    Los Tupas

    Los heroicos Tupamaros de Uruguay!

    (via fluoxetinaa-deactivated20130203)