1. "Canción de cualquier soldado. Quiero aclarar que no es cualquier soldado: es cualquier soldado internacionalista cubano que cayó en Angola."
    — Canción de cualquier soldado - Silvio Rodríguez (via lostestimonios)
     
  2. No sé por qué piensas tú, Ana Belén. A musicalized version of Nicolás Guillén's poem by the same name.

    "No sé por qué piensas tú, soldado, que te odio yo, si somos la misma cosa, yo, tú. Tú eres pobre, lo soy yo, soy de abajo, lo eres tú. De dónde has sacado tú, soldado, que te odio yo?"

     
     

  3. No sé por qué piensas tú, de Nicolás Guillén

    No sé por qué piensas tú,
    soldado, que te odio yo,
    si somos la misma cosa
    yo,
    tú.

    Tú eres pobre, lo soy yo;
    soy de abajo, lo eres tú;
    ¿de dónde has sacado tú,
    soldado, que te odio yo?

    Me duele que a veces tú
    te olvides de quién soy yo;
    caramba, si yo soy tú,
    lo mismo que tú eres yo.

    Pero no por eso yo
    he de malquererte, tú;
    si somos la misma cosa,
    yo,
    tú,
    no sé por qué piensas tú,
    soldado, que te odio yo.

    Ya nos veremos yo y tú,
    juntos en la misma calle,
    hombro con hombro, tú y yo,
    sin odios ni yo ni tú,
    pero sabiendo tú y yo,
    a dónde vamos yo y tú…
    ¡no sé por qué piensas tú,
    soldado, que te odio yo!

     
  4. Uno de Abajo, una cancion escrita por el colombiano Kemel George y aqui cantada por la venezolana Soledad Bravo. George escribe desde la perspectiva de un pobre, reclutado a luchar en una guerra que no entiende y en que no tiene interes. La cancion aparece en el album de Soledad Bravo, Soledad Bravo Vol. 4 de 1972.

    Hermano, voy a la guerra; me llevan muy obligado.
    Las cosas que dejé abiertas recójanlas con cuidado.

    No sea que algo se me pierda cuando la vida me corten:
    en el momento que muera, quiero mis cosas en orden.

    No les doy explicaciones, son cosas muy complicadas:
    me han hablado de la patria y, de eso, no comprendo nada.

    Comprendo que soy muy pobre, que no gano pa’l sustento;
    comprendo que hoy estoy vivo y que mañana estoy muerto.

    Le dice a mi vieja Antonia que no pude despedirme,
    que olvide la ceremonia de darme un beso antes de irme.

    Pues voy en primera fila, que soy el más ignorante
    y el jefe quedó en su casa a reculatar los que falten.

    Hermano, voy a la guerra; me llevan muy obligado.
    Las cosas que dejé abiertas recójanlas con cuidado.

     
     

  5. SOLEDAD BRAVO - UNO DE ABAJO [VENEZUELA, 1972]

    No sea que algo se me pierda, cuando la vida me corten.
    En el momento que muera, quiero mis cosas en orden.

    Here we have a great folk song performed by Venezuela’s Soledad Bravo. It was written by a Colombian named Kemel George, about whom I haven’t found any information other than a small picture of the Simon Bolivar Brigade that joined the fight against the Contras in Nicaragua, a photo in which his name is dubiously captioned (note: not the picture here).

    The title, which translates directly as “One from Below,” refers to the lower classes, los de abajo, and sheds light on how poor working people are often the cannon fodder in wars which they often don’t understand nor have a stake in. The figure here knows that his* fate is sealed and that he will likely not survive the conflict, asking his brother to take care of his affairs so that nothing is left unresolved.

    Musically, this is not typically Venezuelan nor Colombian and uses no culturally significant instruments. We’ll hear guitar, a bass, and violins, but no percussion until the last 20-or-so seconds, which seem to give the listener a feel of marching to battle considering that it enters right as the first verse is repeated.

    It’s a very pretty song, but also very melancholic. Soledad Bravo has one of the best voices, if not the best, in Latin America’s revolutionary folk tradition, well known for her power and tremolo, if not as much for her range. I hope you like it, and let me know if you have any questions or comments!

    SPANISH:

    Hermano, voy a la guerra, me llevan muy obligado.
    Las cosas que dejé abiertas, recójalas con cuidado.

    No sea que algo se me pierda, cuando la vida me corten.
    En el momento que muera, quiero mis cosas en orden.

    No les doy explicaciones, son cosas muy complicadas.
    Me han hablado de la patria, y de eso no comprendo nada.

    Comprendo que soy muy pobre, que no gano para el sustento.
    Comprendo que hoy estoy vivo, y que mañana estoy muerto.

    Le dice a mi vieja Antonia que no pude despedirme,
    que olvide la ceremonia de darme un beso antes de irme.

    Pues voy en primera fila, que soy el mas ignorante.
    Y el jefe quedo en su casa para reclutar los que falten.

    Hermano, voy a la guerra, me llevan muy obligado.
    Las cosas que dejé abiertas, recójalas con cuidado.

    ENGLISH:

    Brother, I’m off to the war, they’re making me go.
    The things I left unfinished, handle them with care.

    I don’t want anything lost when my life is cut short.
    At the time I die, I want my affairs in order.

    I won’t give you explanations, these are very complex things.
    They’ve spoken to me about the homeland, but I don’t understand it at all.

    I understand that I am very poor, that I don’t make enough to live.
    I understand that today I’m alive, and that tomorrow I’m dead.

    Tell my mother Antonia that I couldn’t say goodbye,
    that she forget the ceremony of giving me a kiss before I leave.

    I’m going to the front lines, because I’m the most uneducated.
    The chief stayed back home to recruit those who are missing.

    Brother, I’m off to the war, they’re making me go.
    The things I left unfinished, handle them with care.

    *As in many Spanish-language songs written by men and sung by women, the original gender of the lyrics is retained, which can be confusing for those unfamiliar with the trend. Hence, my reference to “his” despite a female singer.

     

  6. Here is a great song I’d like to share with you all by Chilean singer/songwriter Jorge Venegas, a terribly under-appreciated artist in his genre. This particular song, translated as “Soldier Juan Alberto,” came out in his 1990 album, entitled “El Flaco.” Venegas is known for his optimistic, though often solemn revolutionary songs, remembering the dark years of the Pinochet dictatorship. He often says that “the times are less difficult, but no less gray” in Chile, and many of his songs document the struggles of the Chilean people against both exploitation and oppression. He has released two albums (that I am aware of) since “El Flaco”: “Leyenda Costera” in 2000, and “El Poeta y el Mar” in 2003. He also released a book entitled “Camotazo: A Song of Popular Rebellion” which seeks to “rescue the historic and clandestine memory of song and different expressions of popular, anonymous art during the Pinochet dictatorship.”

    This song tells the story of Juan Alberto, who is recruited into the military at a young age, forced to fulfill his service obligation by repressing a popular uprising. I’m offering the lyrics and my English translation for your convenience. A live video can be found here. Enjoy!

    SPANISH:

    La vida de mi compadre y la de mi amigo Iván
    hizo un giro treinta grados cuando vino el huracán
    también el chico Ernesto y toda la población
    nos miramos a la cara cuando comenzó la acción [x2]

    Llamaron a Juan Alberto porque ya estaba a la edad
    y tenía que cumplir con el servicio militar
    despues de una corta práctica de tan solo un mes no más
    lo mandaron a la calle a silenciar a la ciudad [x2]

    Había que tirar fuerte, esa era el orden de actuar
    porque había mucha gente que exigía libertad
    entonces salimos todos a gritar a la capital
    a defender nuestros derechos: pan, justicia y nuestra paz [x2]

    Soldado Juan Alberto, esa no es la solución
    al hermano que le tiras a la patria no es traidor
    en las murallas te escribo, libres de cualquier lugar
    que la lucha no es contigo sino con tu general! [x2]

    ENGLISH:

    The life of my comrade and that of my friend Ivan
    made a thirty degree turn when the hurricane came
    just like the kid Ernesto, so all the people
    saw eye to eye when the action began [x2]

    They called up Juan Alberto because he was of age
    and had to complete his military service
    after a short practice only a month long
    they sent him to the streets to silence the city [x2]

    He had to shoot mercilessly, those were his orders
    because there were many people around demanding freedom
    so we all left to protest at the capital
    to defend our rights: bread, justice and peace for our people [x2]

    Soldier Juan Alberto, this is not the solution
    the brother who you shoot at is not a traitor to the country
    in the murals I write to you, free from it all,
    that the fight is with your general, not with you! [x2]