1. "Those of us who have spent most of our political lives in the streets need to engage more with theory, and we need to do so with the most open and critical minds we can muster. We need to bring our experiences and reflections to the minds of all of the newly radicalizing or older but reinvigorated radicals for a project centering around popular power, and foster a healthy environment of critical thought that creates a space for feminism to Bolivarianism and Pan-Africanism, while figuring out how to pull liberalism out of these frameworks. And we need to grapple with the dialectic of spontaneity and organization, figuring out how far left movements that have become incredibly decentralized and autonomous can find an interplay with modes of organization that allow the far left to be effective, expanding, and long-term, rather than falling into sectarian dogmas that lose the relevancy that is created in fits and starts."

     

  2. Press Release: Free Music and Politics Festival To Take Place in Seattle August 11-12

    chisparoja:

    We received this from the Everything for Everyone Festival Coordinating Committee.  They ask that others repost and spread this press release.

    Contact: Natalio Perez (347) 541-7305 e4e.fest@gmail.com  www.everythingforeveryone.org @e4efestival

    Seattle, WA - Seattle organizers announce a free, two-day, political and cultural festival called Everything for Everyone meant to connect people from around the country interested in taking the spirit of Occupy to a new level, aimed at changing everything.

    Everything for Everyone will be fertile ground for developing a new political and cultural ecosystem where radical ideas, analysis and strategy are shared, debated, challenged, and advanced.

    It begins outdoors on Saturday August 11th in Jefferson Park’s Northwest corner on Beacon Hill with a program running from 11am to 7pm, featuring guests from around the country. People will be participating in debates, workshops, panels, live music, and the arts.

    On Sunday, August 12th, a plenary discussion will take place at the First Baptist Church on Capitol Hill from 4:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.  At 9:00 pm, the Festival comes to a close with a live concert and dance party at the nearby Highline Bar.

    Organizer Carol Isaac says, ”Occupy’s explosion in the streets exposed the smoldering discontent of millions here and all around the globe.  From shutting down banks and the West Coast Ports to directly meeting the daily needs of the suffering, a new force has awakened to challenge the fundamentals of this system.  We aim to provide a national meeting toward that end.”

    Endorsers of #e4e include the General Assemblies of Occupy Wall Street, Occupy Seattle and Occupy Portland, as well as local and national organizations such as the Black Orchid Collective, the Red Spark Collective, Advance the Struggle and the Malcolm X Grassroots Movement.  A few of the performers over the two days will be: The Super 8, Suntonio Bandanaz, DJ Eazeman, JulieC and River Grimm.

    A variety of panels, workshops and debates will focus on issues ranging from student and worker organizing, foreclosure defense, revolutionary strategy, and capitalism’s threats to our environment.  Other activities will include a film screening, a self-defense class and arts and theatre workshops.

    A full schedule of events and more information can be found at www.everythingforeveryone.org.

     
  3. We have our posters! Everything for Everyone Festival in Seattle, August 11th and 12th.

     
  4. chisparoja:

    If you’re in the Seattle area, come through tonight!

     
  5. chisparoja:

    Phil of the Red Spark Collective talks to Alyona Minkovski of RT about the recent SWAT raid on the home of Occupy Seattle organizers and members of Red Spark.

    My collective. My house. We woke up to the sound of flash grenades on Tuesday morning at about 6AM, all so they could enter an apartment with assault rifles pointed and seize two flyers, a notebook, and a handful of articles of clothing.

    REBLOG (and follow this tumblr, it’s our new Red Spark website)

     
     

  6.  

  7. an-occupied-blog:

    So angry today…. SPD using a SWAT team with battering ram and flash bangs raided the home of some of my friends looking for “anarchist materials” and “clothing”. So many things wrong with this….

    First off, since when is reading material illegal? Or for that matter black clothing? They gonna start hassling everyone in Seattle with a black hoodie?

    Second, the people who were raided are not anarchists, Red Spark Collective is a communist group. Hey SPD, might want to learn a little about political ideologies before you start labeling people. Of course, anarchists are always used as a boogie man….

    Third, their excuse for this is related to the vandalism on May 1st. Since when is breaking a window cause for a no-knock, early morning raid with flash bangs and automatic weapons? We all know that these kinds of raids frequently go wrong and people, often completely innocent people, get shot and killed. Is vandalism worth risking the lives of innocent people? Is it worth the expense and man power when SPD is cutting back services due to budget constraints?

    When will they come for you due to your beliefs and thoughts?

    Fuck the SPD!

    (Source: radical-leftism)

     

  8. fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

    Early morning, July 10, SWAT police forced their way into the Seattle apartment of organizers from the Occupy movement. The sleeping residents scrambled to put on clothes as they were confronted automatic weapons.

    The neighbor Natalio Perez heard the attack from downstairs: “Suddenly we heard the bang of their grenade, and the crashing as police entered the apartment. The crashing and stomping continued for a long time as they tore the place apart.”

    After the raid, the residents pored over the papers handed them by a detective. One explained: “This warrant says that they were specifically looking for ‘anarchist materials’ — which lays out the political police state nature of this right there. In addition they were looking for specific pieces of clothing supposedly connected with a May First incident.

    When the police finally left, they did not arrest anyone.

    This action targets well known activists from Occupy Seattle and the Red Spark Collective (part of the national Kasama network).

    This apartment has been a hub for organizing the Everything 4 Everyone festival in August – to bring together West Coast forces for a cultural and political event building on the year of Occupy.

    The E4E site will update this with more as we receive it, including hopefully statement from those involved. The raid is a heavy-handed threat delivered by armed police aimed at intimidating specific people – but also st suppressing the work to continue the Occupy movement in Seattle, and create E4E as a space for radical gathering.

    Contact: Liam Wright, Red Spark Collective, redsparkcollective@gmail.com

    selucha = Natalio Perez, by the way. This shit was fucked.

     

  9. From our comrades at the Bay of Rage.

    "This pamphlet – written by a group of people of color, women, and queers – is offered in deep solidarity with anyone committed to ending oppression and exploitation materially. It is a critique of dominant forms of identity-based activism in the Bay Area and beyond, from  privilege theory to contemporary interpretations of the legacy of decolonization and national liberation struggles. The pamphlet addresses the institutional struggle over the meaning of antiracist politics, and in particular the impact of nonprofit organizations on shaping the rhetoric and priorities of social justice activism. We argue that prevailing discourses of personal privilege and political representation in fact minimize and misrepresent the severity and structural character of the violence and material deprivation marginalized demographics face. White supremacy, according to this politics, is primarily a psychological attitude which individuals can simply choose to discard instead of a material infrastructure which reproduces race at key sites across society – from racially segmented labor markets to the militarization of the southern border."

    "Our pamphlet argues that the history and legacy of struggles teaches us that, in stark contrast to the rhetoric used by many social justice nonprofits and activists in the Bay Area today, struggle cannot but put us in danger and increase our vulnerability to violent repression. The moment our struggle is even slightly effective, we are in danger. The choice is not between danger and safety, but between the uncertain dangers of revolt and the certainty of continued violence, deprivation, and death. There is no middle ground."

     

  10. malheureuxmarxist:

    selucha:

    Ugh… Okay, some thoughts off the cuff from a chicano and former resident of the Bay. Given my non-presence at this march, take my arguments with a grain of salt.

    1. May Day is not “Immigrants’ Rights Day.” It is International Workers’ Day. This includes (and should highlight) undocumented workers, who are the most dispossessed and exploited throughout this country (as well as many other countries in Western Europe and the Gulf emirates). But simply because the last few years have seen May Day marches which were primarily immigrant in character does not change the fact that M1 is broader than their struggles alone. Immigrant rights NGOs do not have a monopoly on the day and have no right to tell other people/groups what they are and are not allowed to do. Occupy Oakland worked hard for months to build up a May Day that reflected the advancements in peoples’ political consciousness over the past year, and NGOs don’t get to dismiss that and do their routine march (with the same chants, same signs, and same demands as every other year) in the name of tradition.
    2. I’m tired of NGO “radicals” that reduce every demonstration of militancy to one of privilege. Seriously. It’s a nonsense argument—in fact it is a non-argument—by people who are bought and sold by the nonprofit industrial complex. These are the same folks that act like they are radical but facilitate and encourage complete political docility among immigrants (and people of color generally). They peddle in illusions about how the system works. They promote American Dream propaganda. They don’t question the imperialism inherent in the DREAM Act (i.e. encouraging our people to go kill the opponents of the empire in order to get citizenship). They will tell you “the people aren’t ready” for revolution while doing everything possible to make sure the people never are. In Seattle, the immigrant march ended with organizers speaking in front of a sign that said “We the People” in the font of the Declaration of Independence. Que asco! I understand that some immigrants may believe in that stuff and we shouldn’t condemn them for it, but organizers should not encourage these tonterias either. 
    3. A few thousand immigrants marching on May 1st every year is not going to change anything. Do you call that resistance? Organizers should not pat themselves on the back for leading a march for one afternoon, in a completely non-threatening way, with no plans to ramp up militancy if their demands aren’t met. Yet this is precisely the strategy of the last few years for the immigrant rights movement: have a quiet demonstration, go home, promote politics acceptable to the Democratic Party, repeat. Is everything it does bad? No, of course not, and there is diversity among the NGOs that monopolize this work, and some of the workplace organizing these groups do is beneficial to protecting undocumented folks from their employers. I give respect where respect is due. But these organizations intentionally keep the movement trapped in a framework that poses no threat to the power structure at all, yet frame it in radical terminology like “creating a mass movement” or “base building,” while deriding more radical folks as “privileged” or “outside agitators.”
    That’s all I have to say for now.

    First picture: the privileged indigenous people of Cochabamba, Bolivia building barricades in the 2000 Water Wars. They won, by the way.






    Second picture: the outside agitators known as the Brown Berets pose with a compa holding a rifle in the background.

    While I think you bring up some good points, Occupy has had a problem with recognizing that the needs of participants are not always the needs of the most privileged participants. Issues like drug and alcohol use at encampments creates an unsafe, unwelcome environment for people, and while some encampments have been good at stopping it, a lot haven’t.

    This tendency is what the article addresses, undocumented immigrants cannot afford a violent confrontation with police. Black Bloc tactics are undeniably the tactics of radicalized white youth. Speed of Dreams wrote a great criticism awhile back:

    http://bermudaradical.wordpress.com/2012/02/09/what-about-the-black-bloc-and-diversity-of-tactics/

    Ultimately however I do not believe that the black bloc’s tactic is revolutionary in any kind of serious manner. Firstly, the whole Black Bloc phenomenon is an overwhelmingly white petty bourgeois and labour aristocratic phenomena. Further, to borrow what Chairman Fred Hampton had to say about the WUO’s Days of Rage, the Black Bloc tactic is overwhelmingly individualistic, anarchistic (in the sense of chaos) and opportunistic. More often than not it is the adventurististic street fighting of radicalized white youth. Their willingness to fight in the streets belies a serious revolutionary analysis, especially on the topic of revolutionary organization and tactics.

    Yes there are colonized proletarians who take part. I am certainly not saying that it is an exclusively white “left” phenomena, just that in my experience, in North America, it is overwhelmingly so. However, personal anecdotes of the occasional colonized participant aside, it’s been the case since as far back as Seattle that colonized radicals have questioned the rather pale faces behind the black bandanas and ski masks. It’s also incredibly telling that no apologist of the Black Bloc has ever attempted a defence against this critique beyond anecdotal stories of “well this one time I saw some Indians and an African at one Black Bloc!”

    In this sense the defence of the Black Bloc on these grounds is eerily similar to the defence by white feminism of the recent flash-in-the-pan SlutWalk movement’s whiteness and uninterpreted white privilege against the rather blistering critique by author’s like Ernesto Aguilar of People of Colour Organize! Many a time in those back and forths the response of SlutWalk apologists was to show pictures of the SlutWalk in Vancoucer, or San Francisco etc and say “see, there are some of you coloured folk in there!”

    Regardless, though, on the question of colonized proletarian participation, a few good apples in amongst the rot doesn’t change the overall nature of the phenomenon.

    […]

    However, one of the biggest concerns about the Black Bloc style of work from colonized peoples is that it may well actually increase state repression on genuinely revolutionary forces as well as colonized communities, immigrants and other vulnerable groups in North American society. Many apologists and advocates of the Black Bloc would simply sweep this issue under the rug, as if we are overreacting. For example, Seth Tobacman, himself a white man, in his review of BBWR dismissively calls people who have such concerns haters. I’m sorry that these concerns are so beneath a white activist like Tobacman, but for those of us who exist as colonized persons in this white power society, it ain’t hatin’ to feel serious concern that the adventurist actions of petty bourgeois and labour aristocratic white activists might bring increased heat down on our communities.

    The mostly white, petty bourgeois and labour aristocratic anarchist and post-Leninist activists who make up the bulk of the Black Bloc get to go back home most of the time and return to their comfortable, highly privileged lives (despite the high rate of anti-depressant use). Yes sometimes they get arrested, and around the time of the G20 there was even a dragnet of Black Bloc oriented anarchist activists in Ontario. However even their ability to be arrested (in the sense of being able to fight arrest and conviction and to withstand the consequences socially and economically) and the nature of the state repression they suffer arises in part from their class position as members of the oppressor nation.

    While May Day shouldn’t be solely seen as an immigrants’ rights day, the Black Bloc also has to realize that their tactics don’t belong in every situation. An undocumented person simply showing up is showing way more courage than any legal citizen who is in the Black Bloc. There has been a tendency on the Left for “diversity of tactics” to replace any discussion of when those tactics should be implemented. Tactics has replaced strategy.

    Black Bloc’s brand of individualistic, opportunistic violence doesn’t fundamentally challenge state and class structures either. There’s a tendency to assume that just because peaceful protest doesn’t fundamentally challenge state/class structures, that this sort of individualistic violence is the better alternative.

    I should be clear: black bloc is not my tactic of choice, chaos in the streets is not my strategy, anarchism is not my politics. I am a communist, and as a general principle I prefer organized collective actions with discipline and strategy over individual acts of rebellion. But in my experience the most oppressed people are not alienated by property destruction until NGOs and institutional liberals tell them that they should be. Immigrants are perhaps an exception because of their tenuous legal status, and that should be taken into account here, but even in those cases it is generally only the older folks that rebuke it which is a universal phenomenon among basically all racial groups. Read Rosa de Fuego’s response for more into that. I was in Oakland in ‘09 for the Oscar Grant demonstrations, and I certainly saw a lot of community youth smashing windows too, only for the NGOs to go on TV blaming it all on “outside agitators who want to destroy your city” in a blatant act of opportunist race-baiting. Typical liberal nonsense, not giving a fuck about white supremacy until they can cite it erroneously to destroy revolutionary potential among Black and Brown communities.

    It is the mark of liberals to act like militancy is the terrain of “privileged” white people, when in US history basically every riot and rebellion has been led by Black and Brown people. Yeah, black bloc is mostly a white person thing; no argument there, though I think boiling its use down to a question of privilege is intellectually lazy. Regardless, liberal people of color try to elevate the particular into the universal (i.e. black bloc is white, therefore militant radicalism is white) in order to push Black and Brown folks back into the arms of the capitalist state and its street teams of illusion-peddlers and crumb-distributors. (I know this is not the politics coming from the quoted Speed of Dreams article; its author is a revolutionary, albeit one who I disagree with on many major questions—principally the characterization of white folks as “the oppressor nation.”)

    I am in favor of militancy as a broad, generalized trend, and it is something that should be widely encouraged, not discouraged. I’m tired of having the same futile march every year. I’m tired of holding the same signs with the same demands and hearing the same empty promises from paid organizers. Fuck that noise, la historia es nuestra y la hacen los pueblos; it’s time to take our destiny into our own hands. Conversations should be had amongst us about the effectiveness of various types of resistance, including black bloc and individual acts of rebellion. But in Seattle, I would argue that black bloc was actually very effective in helping to accomplish certain goals; namely, the shutting down of the circulation of capital by forcing the temporary closure of numerous banks and downtown shops. Is it a strategy for revolution? No, of course not, and it shouldn’t be elevated to one. But neither is it completely useless, and I guarantee you that the banks and the police are far more concerned with the potency of radicals around Occupy than they are of the docile immigrant rights organizations—the former including numerous POC groups and individuals. I wasn’t in Oakland, so I can’t speak very authoritatively on the events there (as I mentioned in my original response) or the character/timing of any violence vandalism, but forgive me for not trusting the liberal NGO narrative in the original post.

    But simply put, if we tag along at the speed of the liberal NGO immigrant rights movement (which is frankly what they are demanding) we will find ourselves once again working within the framework of the system and as a constituency group for the Democratic Party, because that is precisely what these privilege-baiting nonprofits want. No. Now is the time to be presenting a revolutionary alternative to the existing state of affairs, not pandering to it. Serious efforts should be made to reach out to immigrant communities and find ways to work together, but we should do so in a way that encourages the development of revolutionary consciousness among them, not in a way that reinforces the power of their self-appointed leaders.

    Last thought: there’s a problem to be addressed (and I don’t have an answer) in that, on one hand, we do want to create spaces for the participation of people at the margins of society, and on the other, we also need to realize that changing the world is not a safe activity.

    (Source: oaklandlocal.com, via malheureuxmarxist-deactivated20)

     

  11. tierracita:

    Occupy Oakland may have been “at it for months,” but the group’s naive attempt at supporting the struggles of our most vulnerable communities fell flat on May 1.

    May Day marches in the past, typically led by the immigrant rights group Oakland Sin Fronteras - OSF - served to highlight the fight for immigrant rights. But this year, it was Occupy Oakland and the Black Bloc that made global May Day headlines.

    The Dignity and Resistance group (led primarily by Occupy Oakland organizers) had its banner leading the march, but it was the trust of OSF that brought the majority of Latino migrants to the protest. Ultimately, OSF seemed to be treated merely as a “contingent.”

    ~~~

    It was noon and the mood downtown had grown tense. A haze of smoke from flash-bang grenades filled the air as nearly 100 protesters, led by the Black Bloc and their shields, advanced towards at least 30 riot police. Still more deterrents were launched and the pandemonium continued.

    Meanwhile, at the Fruitvale Plaza, the May Day rally had begun. Scores of families were gathering and the familiar, cheery bells of popsicle vendor carts filled the air. The mood was pleasant and the sun was out. It was a good day for immigrant rights.

    For the past six years, the city of Oakland has given permits to OSF to organize and take to the streets on May Day. This year was no different. Yet, despite permits, stakes are high for undocumented migrants who brave leaving the shadows of invisibility to make their voices heard. In my opinion, they are far braver then the most aggressive, shield-wielding “Occupier” could ever hope to be.

    Arrest for an undocumented immigrant does not just mean a few hours in jail, only to be bailed out. Rather, its deportation from the United States and, often, permanent separation from their families.

    News of the violence downtown had reached the Fruitvale rally and there was a tense feeling among Latino organizers. Their contingents trusted them to execute a safe march with minimal police presence. One leader admonished her high schoolers saying, “If you see an Occupier, engage them, ask them to chant with you. Be inclusive!”

    ~~~

    The Fruitvale event began with its traditional, vibrant gusto. Copal smoke filled the air as Azteca dancers sanctified the event with indigenous ritual. And then they were off, first stop: San Antonio Park.

    Rally cries of “¡El pueblo unido, jamás sera vencido!” (“The people united, will never be defeated”) rang out as Latino youth took the megaphone and led the 2,000-plus marchers through Fruitvale.

    But suddenly, the procession came to a halt as it crested the hill to San Antonio Park.

    Up ahead were seven vans of riot police and hundreds of Black Bloc protesters casually standing about as if waiting for the Fruitvale march to arrive. They seemed blind to the implications of their presence. Undocumented attendants would be forced to either abort the march or pass scores of police, some of whom were filming.

    In fact, a few vulnerable contingents immediately abandoned the procession. The undocumented high schoolers who, just minutes earlier had been leading the march with their spoken-word poems and cries for justice, were now headed for Madison Park where they would remain until they returned home. Many other groups followed suit.

    Meanwhile, Fruitvale organizers approached the occupiers pleading with them to “please stand aside so we can march through.” And, indeed, the Black Bloc did make way for the march. In fact, in a show of solidarity, the occupiers raised their fists in the air and cried with the marchers, “¡El Pueblo, unido, jamás será vencido!

    But the divide was evident.

    ~~~

    After a brief rest at the park, the Dignity and Resistance march (or what remained of it) moved on to Frank Ogawa Plaza. They dispersed soon after arrival, amidst the palpable tension between OO and the police.

    Yet, for the Black Bloc, the night had just begun. Occupiers invoked their privilege to First Amendment Rights as they protested and engaged police, sometimes with beer bottles and paint bombs. Meanwhile the OPD fired back, rushing the crowd and beating people almost indiscriminately. In all, 25 individuals were arrested.

    The arrival of the Immigrant Rights march to Frank Ogawa Plaza was expected to be “a ‘peak time’ when people who don’t know about Occupy Oakland, can learn about us and choose to join this radical movement,” said Lauren Smith, of Occupy Oakland, a few days prior.

    Though I do not doubt Smith’s sincerity, after the events on May 1, the comment seemed more like a mean joke. Based on OO’s May Day performance, its unlikely that Fruitvale’s 99% will be joining their “radical movement” anytime soon.

    ^^THIS THIS THIS

    Ugh… Okay, some thoughts off the cuff from a chicano and former resident of the Bay. Given my non-presence at this march, take my arguments with a grain of salt.

    1. May Day is not “Immigrants’ Rights Day.” It is International Workers’ Day. This includes (and should highlight) undocumented workers, who are the most dispossessed and exploited throughout this country (as well as many other countries in Western Europe and the Gulf emirates). But simply because the last few years have seen May Day marches which were primarily immigrant in character does not change the fact that M1 is broader than their struggles alone. Immigrant rights NGOs do not have a monopoly on the day and have no right to tell other people/groups what they are and are not allowed to do. Occupy Oakland worked hard for months to build up a May Day that reflected the advancements in peoples’ political consciousness over the past year, and NGOs don’t get to dismiss that and do their routine march (with the same chants, same signs, and same demands as every other year) in the name of tradition.
    2. I’m tired of NGO “radicals” that reduce every demonstration of militancy to one of privilege. Seriously. It’s a nonsense argument—in fact it is a non-argument—by people who are bought and sold by the nonprofit industrial complex. These are the same folks that act like they are radical but facilitate and encourage complete political docility among immigrants (and people of color generally). They peddle in illusions about how the system works. They promote American Dream propaganda. They don’t question the imperialism inherent in the DREAM Act (i.e. encouraging our people to go kill the opponents of the empire in order to get citizenship). They will tell you “the people aren’t ready” for revolution while doing everything possible to make sure the people never are. In Seattle, the immigrant march ended with organizers speaking in front of a sign that said “We the People” in the font of the Declaration of Independence. Que asco! I understand that some immigrants may believe in that stuff and we shouldn’t condemn them for it, but organizers should not encourage these tonterias either. 
    3. A few thousand immigrants marching on May 1st every year is not going to change anything. Do you call that resistance? Organizers should not pat themselves on the back for leading a march for one afternoon, in a completely non-threatening way, with no plans to ramp up militancy if their demands aren’t met. Yet this is precisely the strategy of the last few years for the immigrant rights movement: have a quiet demonstration, go home, promote politics acceptable to the Democratic Party, repeat. Is everything it does bad? No, of course not, and there is diversity among the NGOs that monopolize this work, and some of the workplace organizing these groups do is beneficial to protecting undocumented folks from their employers. I give respect where respect is due. But these organizations intentionally keep the movement trapped in a framework that poses no threat to the power structure at all, yet frame it in radical terminology like “creating a mass movement” or “base building,” while deriding more radical folks as “privileged” or “outside agitators.”
    That’s all I have to say for now.

    First picture: the privileged indigenous people of Cochabamba, Bolivia building barricades in the 2000 Water Wars. They won, by the way.






    Second picture: the outside agitators known as the Brown Berets pose with a compa holding a rifle in the background.

    (Source: oaklandlocal.com, via malheureuxmarxist-deactivated20)

     
  12. May 1st, the people’s holiday. A day to fight. A day to dream. Wherever you are, celebrate the fuck out of #m1gs. Be the crisis. Be the rebellion. Pueblo a la calle! Luchamos hasta vencer!

     
  13. occupyguitarmy:

    Our Occupy Guitarmy call to arms! Bring your guitar, string instrument, voice, and/or shakers to Bryant Park on May 1, 2012 at noon. We’ll teach you songs, get you all together, and let you lead in a march to Union Square, where we will play together on stage with Tom Morello. Complete beginners and advanced musicians alike wanted and welcomed. See you soon.

     

  14. selucha:

    Hey everyone,

    Also please reblog this and share it among radical and revolutionary minded folks. I would really appreciate it! If we are successful, this festival could be a catalyzing event for the development of a new radical and revolutionary mainstream on the west coast and in the United States more generally. Below you can read the statement on our Kickstarter account, and you can view our website here. I relocated 3 weeks ago from New York to Seattle to help organize this festival and make it a reality. Please consider making a pledge to help us reach our goal; even $5 or $10 makes a huge difference, and your pledge only becomes a donation if we raise $11,000 within 30 days. Thank you in advance for your support! If I can get half of my followers to contribute just $5, that alone will account for a full 10% of our goal. There are also some really awesome incentives for donating, including t-shirts, posters, and photobooks!

    -Natalio

    ———————————————————

    The Everything for Everyone Festival is a free, two-day music, art, and politics festival scheduled to take place in Seattle, Washington on August 11th and 12th.

    In 2011, the rule of the 1% began to be challenged in brand new ways. A wave of discontent with the old older of things began in Egypt and Tunisia in the Spring. This wave gained strength and momentum into the Fall with the Occupy movement. Now in 2012, there is a desire coming from everywhere on the planet to continue that spirit of resistance of 2011, and to develop it in new and meaningful ways. This desire for change is not manifesting itself in the traditional forms of opposition to the current system, nor is that desire seeking just to “fix” the old oppressive order to make it seem “fairer” to the relative few on the planet.  

    The desire is for a new form of popular struggle, and a new content of the way we relate to each other as people and to our planet - our common home. This desire is not for merely balancing the budgets or repairing the social safety nets in just a few countries, but rather making everything for everyone all over the planet. We would like to invite those all over the world with this desire to come together in a celebration of the world we seek to bring into being, and to exchange our ideas about how make that happen.

    The Everything For Everyone Festival is meant to give a face for this new movement. The festival intends to facilitate debate and cross-fertilization between different ideas, for a mutual flourishing of those engaged in different aspects of a common struggle and those who have yet to participate. A movement for changing everything is much more than actions and protest, as vital as those are. It is a new politics, culture, and forms of organization; a new way of living.

    The Occupy movement has opened eyes and created new possibilities. This festival aims to include those who have participated and those who have yet to participate but are attracted to fundamentally changing society, and to provide a space for the new culture, the new philosophy, and new politics in its diversity and complexity to intermingle and grow stronger. It aims to bring together art, music, workshops, philosophy, and encompassing participation from attendants.

    To make this happen, we need your help. $11,000 is needed just to cover some of our initial costs, including permits, PA equipment, and travel costs for speakers and performers. As you consider whether or not to back this project, remember that your pledge is not merely to fund a festival; it will directly contribute to creating a new culture, forging new relationships among people, and building a new world in which everything truly is for everyone.

    Your companions on the road to freedom,

    The Everything for Everyone Coordinating Committee

    Initial endorsers: Occupy Seattle, Occupy Wall Street, Occupy Portland, Kali Akuno-Malcolm X Grassroots Movement, Black Orchid Collective, Student Anarchist Study Group, Red Spark (Kasama Project), Rising Tide, Advance the Struggle, Rebel Diaz Arts Collective, Troy Davis Collective

     

  15. Hey everyone,

    I don’t make a habit of asking for things, and to be honest I’m pretty awful at it. However, I’d like to make an exception here and ask that you consider reblogging this and sharing it among radical and revolutionary minded folks; I would really appreciate it! Please also consider making a pledge to help us reach our goal; even $5 or $10 makes a huge difference, and your pledge only becomes a donation if we raise $11,000 within 30 days, i.e. you get to keep your money if we don’t hit our goal. Thank you in advance for your support! There are also some really awesome incentives for donating, including t-shirts, posters, and photobooks! If we are successful, this festival could be a catalyzing event for the development of a new radical and revolutionary mainstream on the west coast and in the United States more generally. Below you can read the statement on our Kickstarter account, and you can view our website here. I relocated 3 weeks ago from New York to Seattle to help organize this festival and make it a reality, so you can be sure I think it’s legit :-). 

    -Natalio

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    The Everything for Everyone Festival is a free, two-day music, art, and politics festival scheduled to take place in Seattle, Washington on August 11th and 12th.

    In 2011, the rule of the 1% began to be challenged in brand new ways. A wave of discontent with the old older of things began in Egypt and Tunisia in the Spring. This wave gained strength and momentum into the Fall with the Occupy movement. Now in 2012, there is a desire coming from everywhere on the planet to continue that spirit of resistance of 2011, and to develop it in new and meaningful ways. This desire for change is not manifesting itself in the traditional forms of opposition to the current system, nor is that desire seeking just to “fix” the old oppressive order to make it seem “fairer” to the relative few on the planet.  

    The desire is for a new form of popular struggle, and a new content of the way we relate to each other as people and to our planet - our common home. This desire is not for merely balancing the budgets or repairing the social safety nets in just a few countries, but rather making everything for everyone all over the planet. We would like to invite those all over the world with this desire to come together in a celebration of the world we seek to bring into being, and to exchange our ideas about how make that happen.

    The Everything For Everyone Festival is meant to give a face for this new movement. The festival intends to facilitate debate and cross-fertilization between different ideas, for a mutual flourishing of those engaged in different aspects of a common struggle and those who have yet to participate. A movement for changing everything is much more than actions and protest, as vital as those are. It is a new politics, culture, and forms of organization; a new way of living.

    The Occupy movement has opened eyes and created new possibilities. This festival aims to include those who have participated and those who have yet to participate but are attracted to fundamentally changing society, and to provide a space for the new culture, the new philosophy, and new politics in its diversity and complexity to intermingle and grow stronger. It aims to bring together art, music, workshops, philosophy, and encompassing participation from attendants.

    To make this happen, we need your help. $11,000 is needed just to cover some of our initial costs, including permits, PA equipment, and travel costs for speakers and performers. As you consider whether or not to back this project, remember that your pledge is not merely to fund a festival; it will directly contribute to creating a new culture, forging new relationships among people, and building a new world in which everything truly is for everyone.

    Your companions on the road to freedom,

    The Everything for Everyone Coordinating Committee

    Initial endorsers: Occupy Seattle, Occupy Wall Street, Occupy Portland, Kali Akuno-Malcolm X Grassroots Movement, Black Orchid Collective, Student Anarchist Study Group, Red Spark (Kasama Project), Rising Tide

    (Source: selucha)